Disc-Brake Upgrade
 

The Early Classic Front Disc-Brake Conversion Kit.  All you need is brake fluid!

1.  The conversion to front disc brakes on the '60-'70 GM trucks is a fairly involved process, but the Early Classic Enterprises kit comes with everything needed for installation, including the master cylinder, proportioning valve and brake lines.  This brake upgrade kit includes a set of 2.5-inch drop spindles.  For truck owners not wanting to lower their ride, ECE also manufactures a stock-height disc-brake spindle.

FTER WE ENTHUSIASTS PUT A STRONG SMALL-BLOCK CHEVY (OR BIGGER) ENGINE IN OUR PICKUPS IN SEARCH OF WHITE-KNUCKLING ACCELERATION, WE HAVE TO THINK ABOUT THE OTHER PART OF THE EQUATION: SLOWING EVERYTHING DOWN.
     The mid-'60s (and some of the early-'70s) Chevy pickups originally came with drum front brakes.  They require too much brake pedal pressure, they fade after one big stop and they aren't very powerful.  Frankly, they suck.  It takes only one trip down the street in an original old truck to realize how far technology has advanced in the last 30 years or so.  It's no surprise that brakes (and suspension) are generally first on the "to-do" list of most truck owners.
     Fortunately, there are several choices available to help with these problems.  For nearly 10 years, Early Classic Enterprises has been manufacturing brake and suspension upgrade kits for the '60-'72 Chevy and GMC trucks.  With their help we showcase here the installation of a front disc-brake conversion on a '66 C-10 pickup.
     Not only will this upgrade kit give you modern stopping power, the lowered stance (if desired) will improve the looks and handling of your classic, too.  Early Classic Enterprises also has 1.5-inch drop-front coil springs and drop shocks for these trucks.  You can end up with a full 4-inch drop if you want it.

 


 

Source
Early Classic Enterprises
Dept. TB, 5843 E. Clinton Ave., Fresno, CA  93727, 888/777-0395

Disconnect the outer tie-rod ends.
2.  To begin the installation, the truck needs to be supported either on a lift or using jack-stands to raise the suspension and allow the front tires to be removed.  At this point, the outer tie-rod ends are loosened and then popped free from the steering arm to allow the spindle to turn back and forth for better access to the ball joints.

Remove the drum, hub and bearings.
3.  The wheel bearings and hub are then removed, along with the old brake drum.  This also allows more access to remove the stock spindle.